Global News

The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) is holding a public consultation from 13 January to 13 March 2020 on the requirements for global essential climate observations needed by users of climate data and Essential Climate Variables

The parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity meet this week in Rome as part of the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework at the second meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group. To support the dialogue and negotiations on priorities, goals, and targets for mountains in 2030 and beyond, an initiative led by UN Environment and GRID-Arendal (GRIDA), with contributions from its partners - the Mountain Research Initiative (MRI) and the Global Mountain Biodiversity Assessment (GMBA) – led to the development and publication of a Policy Brief titled "Elevating Mountains in the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework 2.0", which builds on previous efforts to showcase mountains that began as part of the first meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group held in Nairobi in August 2019.

The annual Prix de Quervain is funded by the Swiss Committee on Polar and High Altitude Research SKPH and the Commission for the Research Station on Jungfrauchjoch SKJF.  

On behalf of the international journal GAIA – Ecological Perspectives for Science and Society, Masters students are invited to apply for the GAIA Masters Student Paper Award which recognises research for important societal transformations and transdisciplinary environmental and sustainability science.

The Swiss Foundation for Alpine Research (SSAF) invites young researchers to apply for the ProMontesPrize (PMP) which recognises outstanding achievements towards the goal of safeguarding the future of the Alpine landscape. Deadline to apply is 31 March, 2020.

The University of Basel, the Swiss Academies of the Arts and Sciences, and the Network for Transdisciplinary Research have come together to develop a free massive open online course (MOOC) called 'Partnering for Change: Link Research to Societal Changes' offered on the online platform Future Learn.

This course will examine the principles, processes, and uses of transdisciplinarity in research to address societal changes. This course begins 30 March 2020. 

Research provides new insight on mountain glacier–derived water resource systems, impacting up to 1.9 billion people globally.

Scientists from around the world have assessed the planet’s 78 mountain glacier-based water systems and, for the first time, ranked them in order of their importance to adjacent lowland communities, as well as their vulnerability to future environmental and socioeconomic changes. These systems, known as mountain water towers, store and transport water via glaciers, snow packs, lakes, and streams, thereby supplying invaluable water resources to 1.9 billion people globally—roughly a quarter of the world’s population.

New research published in the journal PLOS ONE finds that rising temperatures are causing perennial snowbanks in Mongolia's Sayan Mountains to melt – putting the people and animals they support at risk. 

Deep in the Sayan Mountains of northern Mongolia, patches of ice rest year-round in the crooks between hills.

Locals in this high tundra call the perennial snowbanks munkh mus, or eternal ice. They’re central to lives of the region’s traditional reindeer herders, who depend on the snowy patches for clean drinking water and to cool down their hoofed charges in summer months.

Now, a new study led by archaeologist William Taylor suggests that this eternal ice, and the people and animals it supports, may be at risk because of soaring global temperatures.

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