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New research provides the first scientific evidence of overwintering fires in Alaska and Canada boreal forests. Due to climate change, these “zombie fires” appear to be increasing in frequency.

The study published in Nature was led by Vrije University Amsterdam with co-authors at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s Alaska Fire Service. The researchers found that extreme summer temperatures and intense burning enable some wildfires to smolder in peat beneath snow during winter, even when temperatures drop to minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit. When warm and dry conditions arrive in spring, these fires flare up.

Glacier runoff from one of the largest icefields in North America has been increasing for more than three decades, researchers from the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have found.

As the Juneau Icefield continues to lose mass, the flow will increase until 'peak runoff' is reached, the researchers predicted.

For over 20 years, the Mountain Legacy Project has been capturing change in Canada’s mountain landscapes through repeat photography. This interactive photo essay offers a glimpse at some of these incredible images and the landscapes of our changing mountains over time.

As the MRI Coordination Office celebrates its 20th anniversary, we also take this opportunity to reflect on our changing mountains past, present, and future, and the role of the research community in both shaping and telling their stories. In this interactive photo essay, Mary Sanseverino of the Mountain Legacy Project shares some of this project's amazing work capturing change in Canada's mountains through the world’s largest collection of systematic high-resolution historic mountain photographs and a vast and growing collection of repeat images.

What are the main challenges that impede sustainable mountain governance at the local level? Research undertaken by the MRI’s Mountain Governance Working Group seeks to shed light on this important question.

There is growing consensus that securing a sustainable future for our changing mountains requires effective governance. However, the biogeophysical complexity and diversity of mountain social-ecological systems, their vulnerability to climatic and global change processes, their status as commons, and the vital importance of their ecosystem services for people living both in and far from mountains mean that mountains pose a particular set of governance challenges – few of which are well understood. New research conducted by the MRI’s Mountain Governance Working Group and published this month in the journal Mountain Research and Development seeks to address this knowledge gap.

The Glacier Model Intercomparison Project (GlacierMIP3) is beginning its third phase. GlacierMIP is a framework for a coordinated intercomparison of global-scale glacier mass change models to foster model improvements and reduce uncertainties in global glacier projections.

Submission deadline 1 December 2021.

A comprehensive inventory of Swiss glacial lakes shows how the lake landscape in the high mountains has changed since the end of the Little Ice Age in around 1850.

Due to climate change, the glaciers of the Alps are melting. When the sometimes huge ice fields retreat, they often leave behind depressions and natural dams in the exposed landscape. The basins can fill with meltwater and new glacial lakes are formed. Since the end of the Little Ice Age around 1850, almost 1,200 new lakes have been added in formerly glaciated regions in the Swiss Alps. Around 1,000 still exist today. This is shown by a new, comprehensive inventory of all Swiss glacial lakes.

The first Conéctate A+ academic exchange webinar took place this week, helping students in the Andes+ region discover study and scholarship opportunities in Switzerland.

The Adaptation at Altitude Solutions Portal allows users to access and explore comprehensive knowledge on tried and tested climate change adaptation solutions for mountain regions, see where they have been implemented, and by who.

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